What these results highlight is that the gut is one of the most under-appreciated organs in your body.

While most people think its sole purpose is to break down food, it also plays a vital role in absorbing nutrients as well as feeding the bacteria living in your gut (the gut microbiota).

There is a lot of interaction between the body’s immune system and bacteria in the gut. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have, over the last few years, analysed how the composition of the gut changes in different diseases, how the body’s immune system interacts with these tiny hitchhikers and particularly how that relationship may function in disease.

“A huge proportion of your immune system is actually in your GI tract,” says Dan Peterson, assistant professor of pathology at Johns Hopkins.

“The immune system is inside your body, and the bacteria are outside your body.” And yet they interact. For example, certain cells in the lining of the gut spend their lives excreting massive quantities of antibodies into the gut.

“That’s what we’re trying to understand—what are the types of antibodies being made, and how is the body trying to control the interaction between ourselves and bacteria on the outside?”

A poor digestive system can lead to a whole host of issues such as:

  1. Abdominal pain such as bloating, gas, diarrhoea
  2. Food allergies or sensitivities
  3. Anxiety, Depression, Mood swings
  4. Skin problems like eczema, rosacea
  5. Diabetes
  6. Autoimmune disease
  7. Frequent Infections
  8. Poor memory or loss of concentration (ADD or ADHD)

How you live reflects on how well or not the conditions for certain bacteria thrive, not only in your gut, but throughout your entire body.

In summary, your gut health matters!

Credit source:  http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org